The Nine Types of Book Review

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Once a book is published, there are two things an author hopes for: sales and reviews. Sales are good because they allow a writer to be financially supported as they write their next book. Reviews are good because they lead to more sales. And the more stars each review has, the more validated the author feels and the more confidence potential readers have.

But regardless of whether a book is good, bad or somewhere in between, and assuming it has had enough exposure, it will have each of the following types of review.

The Never-Read-It Review
Obviously someone who reviews a book they’ve never read has a nefarious purpose, either to promote or prevent the reading of it. Platforms like Amazon usually don’t allow a review of a product that hasn’t been bought directly from them so that helps a little. Platforms like Goodreads rely on the honesty of the reading community they have assembled. It doesn’t always work. Continue reading

Knowing When to Stop: How Much Editing is Too Much?

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The idea of writing the first draft of a book – when it’s still in your mind, when you haven’t done it yet – seems like such a large mountain to climb. So when you finally reach the top of that goal, you celebrate. Hard. If it’s your first book, that’s because you don’t realise it’s a false hill, that you aren’t at the top at all. If it’s not your first book, it’s because you know the really tough work is just starting and celebrating each and every achievement is one of the keys to not letting writing drive you insane.

Unless you’re a first draft genius (and nobody is a first draft genius), the amount of time it takes to rewrite and edit your book to publishable standard will be lengthy. For some it will be longer than it took to write the first draft. There’ll be a second draft and a third draft and a fourth draft and on and on it goes.

So how do we know when it’s time to stop editing? Continue reading

How To Write A Book Review

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In a couple of places now, I’ve seen authors asking for suggestions on how to get readers to leave reviews on Goodreads and Amazon and other book sales platforms. People seem happy to buy and read their books but often feel they don’t have the skills to write a book review that would be useful to either other potential readers or the author.

So next time one of your readers umms and ahhs about posting a review of your book, send them a link to this blog post. I’ve broken it down into a few areas that hopefully make it a lot less scary and hopefully resulting in a lot more reviews. (Of course, I can’t guarantee the reviews will be positive though – that’s entirely up to the quality of your book.) Continue reading

One Year Ago Today, A Little Blog Was Born

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It was one year ago today that I created and posted my first blog. Since then, I’ve posted 166 times (with plenty more scheduled for the future), I’ve had 1,710 views, 883 visitors and 292 likes. The majority of my readers are in Australia and the US but I’ve also been read by people from the UK, Canada, New Zealand, Bangladesh, India, the Philippines, Ireland, Vietnam, Finland, Malaysia, Hong Kong, and several handfuls of other countries.

I’ve written more in the past year than I’ve ever written before and having this blog is the reason why. Because I’ve set myself goals and I’ve managed to stick to them, posting a book review every Monday (excluding the month of Project October, which you can read about here, here, here, here and here ) as well as blog posts on various writing related topics and samples of my creative writing with the occasional guest post thrown in.

In the tradition of all good writers who want to rest on the laurels of all their previous hard work and have reached a milestone that is as good an excuse as any, here are some of the highlights of Year One. Continue reading