An Interview with Louise Truscott by Louise Truscott

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If you’re wondering why I’m interviewing myself, you obviously haven’t read my post from Tuesday (Can’t Get Anyone to Interview You About Your Book? Interview Yourself!). Read it first and then hopefully this won’t seem quite so self-indulgent.

How long have you been writing?
I don’t know where the time has gone but it’s been over twenty-five years now. I started, like all children, writing adorable yet cringe-worthy stories for my primary school English class, progressed to angsty poetry in high school and by Year 12, I was writing a novella. When I started university, I moved into writing romance. I was so sure that I was going to be the next queen of Australian romance fiction. But I found the confines of the genre very limiting. I didn’t want to write one thing, I wanted to write everything. Continue reading

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Should You Market Your Book, Yourself or Both? (Part 2: Marketing Yourself)

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On Tuesday I looked at marketing your book and today I continue the theme by looking at ways to market yourself. It’s not everybody’s favourite task – in fact, I once asked a friend if she wanted to be the public face and name of my books because I was so afraid of the scrutiny (she declined) – but if you’re planning on publishing more than one book, establishing your identity as a writer can be just as important as establishing the quality of an individual book.

Find Your Angle
Everybody has an angle – they just have to discover what it is. John Grisham is a former lawyer so when he started writing crime books, it made total sense. Jeffrey Archer was conned out of a significant amount of money so when he wrote a book about characters trying to exact their revenge for the same thing and get their money back, it was a great selling point. When Lauren Conrad wrote a novel about a girl and her best friend appearing on a reality show, the fact that it was a thinly veiled autobiography and she had a guaranteed readership from the audience of the show she had appeared on helped to ring up the sales, even if the critical acclaim didn’t accompany it. Continue reading

Advice To An Almost Famous Author

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There are probably a number of writers out there who think (and hope) it’s only a matter of time (and getting your writing in front of the right person) before the transition will begin from aspiring author to actual auteur. They might be right or they might be a long way off.

Once an author has achieved a level of success, it’s often too late to give any advice, especially if that success has gone straight to their head. So here’s a few important things to remember aimed at the almost famous author to help avoid becoming an asshole (as famous people so often do). Continue reading